Hazar

ha'-zar (chatsar, construct of chatser, "an enclosure," "settlement," or "village"): Is frequently the first element in Hebrew place-names.

See the definition of hazard in the KJV Dictionary

1. Hazar-addar:

Hazar-addar (Hebrew chatsar 'addar), a place on the southern boundary of Judah (Nu 34:4), is probably identical with Hazron (Jos 15:3), which, in this case, however, is separated from Addar (the King James Version "Adar"). It seems to have lain somewhere to the Southwest of Kadesh-barnea.

See also the McClintock and Strong Biblical Cyclopedia.

2. Hazar-enan:

Hazar-enan (Hebrew chatsar 'enan, "village of springs": enan is Aramaic; Once (Eze 47:17) it is called Enon), a place, unidentified, at the junction of the northern and eastern frontiers of the land promised to Israel (Nu 34:9 f; compare Eze 47:17; 48:1). To identify it with the sources of the Orontes seems to leave too great a gap between this and the places named to the South. Buhl (GAP, 66 f) would draw the northern boundary from Nahr el-Qasimiyeh to the foot of Hermon, and would locate Hazar-enan at Banias. The springs there lend fitness to the name; a condition absent from el-Chadr, farther east, suggested by von Kesteren. But there is no certainty.

3. Hazar-gaddah:

Hazar-gaddah (Hebrew hatsar-gaddah), a place in the territory of Judah "toward the border of Edom in the South" (Jos 15:21,27). Eusebius, Onomasticon (s.v. "Gadda") places it in the uttermost parts of the Daroma, overlooking the Dead Sea. This might point to the site of Masada, or to the remarkable ruins of Umm Bajjaq farther south (GAP, 185).

4. Hazar-hatticon:

Hazar-hatticon (the Revised Version (British and American) HAZER-HATTICON; Hebrew chatser ha-tikhon, "the middle village"), a place named on the ideal border of Israel (Eze 47:16). The context shows that it is identical with Hazar-enan, for which this is apparently another name. Possibly, however, it is due to a scribal error.

5. Hazarmaveth:

Hazarmaveth (Hebrew chatsarmaweth), the name of a son of Joktan attached to a clan or district in South Arabia (Ge 10:26; 1Ch 1:20). It is represented by the modern Chadramaut, a broad and fruitful valley running nearly parallel with the coast for about 100 miles, north of el-Yemen. The ruins and inscriptions found by Glaser show that it was once the home of a great civilization, the capital being Sabata (Ge 10:7) (Glaser, Skizze, II, 20, 423 ff).

6. Hazar-shual:

Hazar-Shual (Hebrew chatsar shu`al), a place in the South of Judah (Jos 15:28) assigned to Simeon (Jos 19:3; 1Ch 4:28). It was reoccupied after the exile (Ne 11:27). Sa`weh on a hill East of Beersheba has been suggested; but there is no certainty.

7. Hazar-susah:

Hazar-susah (Hebrew chatsar cucah, Jos 19:5), Hazar-susim (Hebrew chatsar cucim, 1Ch 4:31). As it stands, the name means "station of a mare" or "of horses," and it occurs along with Beth-marcaboth, "place of chariots," which might suggest depots for trade in chariots and horses. The sites have not been identified.

W. Ewing

 
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