eks-pe'-di-ent (sumphero): The Greek word translated "expedient" (sumphero) means literally, "to bear or bring together"; with a personal reference, "to be well or profitable." In the New Testament it never means "profitable" or "convenient" as opposed to what is strictly right. It is translated "expedient" (Joh 11:50, "it is expedient for us," the Revised Version (British and American) "for you"; Joh 16:7, "It is expedient for you that I go away," i.e. "profitable," "for your good," Joh 18:14; 1Co 6:12; 10:23; 2Co 8:10; 12:1). In Mt 19:10, instead of "not good to marry," the Revised Version (British and American) has "not expedient." The modern sense of "expediency" as "hastening" or "acceleration," is not found in the New Testament, any more than its bad sense of "mere convenience." "Nothing but the right can ever be expedient" (Whately).

See the definition of expedient in the KJV Dictionary

W. L. Walker

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